Sculpted in Ice

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Ice—Transitory and Eternal

Ice—Transitory and Eternal

Ice—Transitory
and Eternal

A Surprising Interpretation of Cable

A Surprising Interpretation of Cable

A Surprising Interpretation
of Cable

Sculpted in Ice

Sculpted in Ice

Sculpted in Ice

The weather wasn’t the only thing icy on a frigid day in New
York City. At the David Yurman boutique in Soho, visitors
encountered a cable bracelet with an entirely different kind
of cool, a form as captivating as it was ephemeral.

 

Carved out of a tremendous block of ice by artist Shintaro
Okamoto, the bracelet was a powerful counterpoint to the
everlasting beauty of precious metals and diamonds—ice of
a different kind. In this video, see Okamoto work on the
piece as he describes the process of his craft.

The weather wasn’t the only thing icy on a frigid day in New
York City. At the David Yurman boutique in Soho, visitors
encountered a cable bracelet with an entirely different kind
of cool, a form as captivating as it was ephemeral.

 

Carved out of a tremendous block of ice by artist Shintaro
Okamoto, the bracelet was a powerful counterpoint to the
everlasting beauty of precious metals and diamonds—ice of
a different kind. In this video, see Okamoto work on the
piece as he describes the process of his craft.

The weather wasn’t the only thing icy on a frigid day in New York City. At the David Yurman boutique in Soho, visitors encountered a cable bracelet with an entirely different kind of cool, a form as captivating as it was ephemeral.

 

Carved out of a tremendous block of ice by artist Shintaro Okamoto, the bracelet was a powerful counterpoint to the everlasting beauty of precious metals and diamonds—ice of a different kind. In this video, see Okamoto work on the piece as he describes the process of his craft.

 

“In sculpting the bracelet, I had to reacquaint myself with
the most iconic of sculptural vocabulary—lines, balance,
symmetry—from the very start. To learn the final form to the
last of the details, really made me appreciate how perfect,
how beautiful this bracelet design is.”

   Shintaro Okamoto

“In sculpting the bracelet, I had to reacquaint myself with
the most iconic of sculptural vocabulary—lines, balance,
symmetry—from the very start. To learn the final form to the
last of the details, really made me appreciate how perfect,
how beautiful this bracelet design is.”

   Shintaro Okamoto

“In sculpting the bracelet, I had
to reacquaint myself with the
most iconic of sculptural
vocabulary— lines, balance,
symmetry—from the very start.
To learn the final form to
the last of the details,
really made me appreciate
how perfect, how beautiful
this bracelet design is.”

Shintaro Okamoto

Detail of Shintaro Okamoto carving the DY cable bracelet from ice. Detail of Shintaro Okamoto carving the DY cable bracelet from ice.

Detail of Shintaro Okamoto carving the DY cable bracelet. 

Detail of Shintaro Okamoto carving the DY cable bracelet. 

Detail of Shintaro Okamoto carving the DY cable bracelet. 

The Double
Meaning of Ice

The Double
Meaning of Ice

The Double
Meaning of Ice 

Some say that diamonds are called “ice” because
they resemble frozen water. Others cite a more
scientific reason: a diamond has one of the
highest thermal conductivities at room
temperature of any material.

 

Regardless of why, their crystalline, mesmerizing
beauty is where the similarity between ice and
diamonds ends. The nickname juxtaposes two
diametrically opposed materials, playing with the
contradiction of the transient with the everlasting.

 

David Yurman was one of the very first jewelry
designers to set diamonds in sterling silver. He
calls these creations Silver Ice, an apt name
for pieces that pair everyday style with
exquisite luxury.

Some say that diamonds are called “ice” because
they resemble frozen water. Others cite a more
scientific reason: a diamond has one of the
highest thermal conductivities at room
temperature of any material.

 

Regardless of why, their crystalline, mesmerizing
beauty is where the similarity between ice and
diamonds ends. The nickname juxtaposes two
diametrically opposed materials, playing with the
contradiction of the transient with the everlasting.

 

David Yurman was one of the very first jewelry
designers to set diamonds in sterling silver. He
calls these creations Silver Ice, an apt name
for pieces that pair everyday style with
exquisite luxury.

Some say that diamonds are called “ice” because they resemble frozen water. Others cite a more scientific reason: a diamond has one of the highest thermal conductivities at room temperature of any material.

 

Regardless of why, their crystalline, mesmerizing beauty is where the similarity between ice and diamonds ends. The nickname juxtaposes two diametrically opposed materials, playing with the contradiction of the transient with the everlasting.

 

David Yurman was one of the very first jewelry designers to set diamonds in sterling silver. He calls these creations Silver Ice, an apt name for pieces that pair everyday style with exquisite luxury.

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