The Beauty Of Pearls

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The Beauty Of Pearls

The Beauty Of Pearls

The Beauty
Of Pearls

The Queen of Gems and the Gems of Queens

The Queen of Gems and the Gems of Queens

The Queen of Gems and the Gems of Queens

Swimmer in a coral reef under water. Swimmer in a coral reef under water.

Ama Pearl diver at work. Photograph. Around 1930.

Ama Pearl diver at work. Photograph. Around 1930.

Ama Pearl diver at work. Photograph. Around 1930.

Image of HJ pearl suite Image of HJ pearl suite

In 1982, David was awarded Designer of the Year for innovation in jewelry by the Cultured Pearl Association of America and Japan for his Mabe Pearl Necklace.

In 1982, David was awarded Designer of the Year for innovation
in jewelry by the Cultured Pearl Association of America and
Japan for his Mabe Pearl Necklace.

In 1982, David was awarded Designer of the Year for innovation
in jewelry design by the Cultured Pearl Association of
America and Japan for his Mabe Pearl Necklace.

A David Yurman Signature

A David Yurman Signature

A David Yurman
Signature

For David Yurman, pearls have always been a key
element of his design vocabulary. He has strung them
on beaded necklaces, juxtaposed them with sculpted
metal and won awards for his unconventional approach
to their lustrous beauty.

 

When designing with pearls, David and his son, Evan,
always integrate DY signature motifs like cable and
diamond accents. There are both everyday pieces to
pair with jeans set in 18 karat gold or sterling silver and
statement pieces suited for special occasions or
weddings. For the connoisseur, David Yurman’s High
Jewelry Collection presents one-of-a-kind creations
highlighting the world’s most beautiful and coveted
Akoya, Tahitian and South Sea pearls. Sourcing,
curating and matching these pearls – extraordinary
in color, luster and size — to create a necklace or
bracelet can take months or years.

For David Yurman, pearls have always been a key
element of his design vocabulary. He has strung them
on beaded necklaces, juxtaposed them with sculpted
metal and won awards for his unconventional approach
to their lustrous beauty.

 

When designing with pearls, David and his son, Evan,
always integrate DY signature motifs like cable and
diamond accents. There are both everyday pieces to
pair with jeans set in 18 karat gold or sterling silver and
statement pieces suited for special occasions or
weddings. For the connoisseur, David Yurman’s High
Jewelry Collection presents one-of-a-kind creations
highlighting the world’s most beautiful and coveted
Akoya, Tahitian and South Sea pearls. Sourcing,
curating and matching these pearls – extraordinary
in color, luster and size — to create a necklace or
bracelet can take months or years.

For David Yurman, pearls have always been
a key element of his design vocabulary. He
has strung them on beaded necklaces,
juxtaposed them with sculpted metal and
won awards for his unconventional
approach to their lustrous beauty.

 

When designing with pearls, David and his
son, Evan, always integrate DY signature
motifs like cable and diamond accents.
There are both everyday pieces to pair with
jeans set in 18 karat gold or sterling silver
and statement pieces suited for special
occasions or weddings. For the connoisseur,
David Yurman’s High Jewelry Collection
presents one-of-a-kind creations
highlighting the world’s most beautiful and
coveted Akoya, Tahitian and South Sea
pearls. Sourcing, curating and matching
these pearls – extraordinary in color, luster
and size — to create a necklace or bracelet
can take months or years.

A David Yurman Extraordinary South Sea Baroque Pearl and Diamond Necklace. A David Yurman Extraordinary South Sea Baroque Pearl and Diamond Necklace.

The Power Of Pearls

The Power Of Pearls

The Power Of Pearls

Pearls are sometimes considered demure. Although
they are an enduring symbol of elegance and
femininity, there is nothing staid about them. For
thousands of years, the world’s most powerful and
iconic women have favored this beguiling treasure.
Pearl jewelry dating back to 420 BC, now on display at
the Louvre, was found in the sarcophagus of a Persian
princess. Legend has it that Cleopatra brazenly dissolved
an enormous pearl in a glass of vinegar and drank it to
prove to her lover Marc Antony that she could consume
the wealth of a nation in a single meal.

 

Fast forward to the modern era, when pearls became
a style statement for women who defined the meaning of
moxie. You can’t picture the 1920s flappers, or Coco Chanel,
for that matter, without a strand of pearls. As skirts got
shorter and necklaces got longer, these women made|
history, breaking the rules of style and challenging
the definition of “ladylike” behavior.

Pearls are sometimes considered demure. Although
they are an enduring symbol of elegance and
femininity, there is nothing staid about them. For
thousands of years, the world’s most powerful and
iconic women have favored this beguiling treasure.
Pearl jewelry dating back to 420 BC, now on display at
the Louvre, was found in the sarcophagus of a Persian
princess. Legend has it that Cleopatra brazenly dissolved
an enormous pearl in a glass of vinegar and drank it to
prove to her lover Marc Antony that she could consume
the wealth of a nation in a single meal.

 

Fast forward to the modern era, when pearls became
a style statement for women who defined the meaning of
moxie. You can’t picture the 1920s flappers, or Coco Chanel,
for that matter, without a strand of pearls. As skirts got
shorter and necklaces got longer, these women made|
history, breaking the rules of style and challenging
the definition of “ladylike” behavior.

Pearls are sometimes considered demure. Although they are an enduring symbol of elegance and femininity, there is nothing staid about them. For thousands of years, the world’s most powerful and iconic women have favored this beguiling treasure. Pearl jewelry dating back to 420 BC, now on display at the Louvre, was found in the sarcophagus of a Persian princess. Legend has it that Cleopatra brazenly dissolved an enormous pearl in a glass of vinegar and drank it to prove to her lover Marc Antony that she could consume the wealth of a nation in a single meal.

 

Fast forward to the modern era, when
pearls became a style statement for women
who defined the meaning of moxie. You
can’t picture the 1920s flappers, or Coco
Chanel, for that matter, without a strand of
pearls. As skirts got shorter and necklaces
got longer, these women made history,
breaking the rules of style and challenging
the definition of “ladylike” behavior.

Oyster with a pearl inside. Oyster with a pearl inside.
Image of Japanese pearl diver Image of Japanese pearl diver

Unidentified Artist, after Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Japanese Three Divers
at the Married Rocks,
 n.d. Color woodblock Ackland Art
Museum, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
UNC Art Department Collection, 69.6.5

Unidentified Artist, after Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Japanese
Three Divers at the Married Rocks, n.d. Color woodblock
Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill. UNC Art Department Collection, 69.6.5

Unidentified Artist, after Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Japanese
Three Divers at the Married Rocks, n.d. Color woodblock
Ackland Art Museum, The University of North Carolina
at Chapel Hill. UNC Art Department Collection, 69.6.5

Image of Japanese pearl diver Image of Japanese pearl diver

Great Depths For Beauty

Great Depths
For Beauty

Great Depths
For Beauty

Women who’ve worn pearls are not the gem’s
only icons. Equally inspiring to David Yurman
are Japan’s free-divers, the storied women
who have been harvesting pearls from the
Pacific Ocean floor for more than 2000 years.
Known as Ama, which means “sea women,”
they can hold their breath for minutes at a
time, reaching depths of up to 30 meters
without scuba gear or air tanks. It’s a feat that
takes intense training, but once they’ve
mastered the dive, the Ama may continue
their livelihood well into old age.

Women who’ve worn pearls are not the gem’s only icons. Equally inspiring to David Yurman are Japan’s free-divers, the storied women who have been harvesting pearls from the Pacific Ocean floor for more than 2000 years. Known as Ama, which means “sea women,” they can hold their breath for minutes at a time, reaching depths of up to 30 meters without scuba gear or air tanks. It’s a feat that takes intense training, but once they’ve mastered the dive, the Ama may continue their livelihood well into old age.

Women who’ve worn pearls are not the
gem’s only icons. Equally inspiring to
David Yurman are Japan’s free-divers,
the storied women who have been
harvesting pearls from the Pacific
Ocean floor for more than 2000 years.
Known as Ama, which means “sea women,”
they can hold their breath for minutes
at a time, reaching depths of up to 30
meters without scuba gear or air tanks.
It’s a feat that takes intense training,
but once they’ve mastered the dive,
the Ama may continue their livelihood
well into old age.

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