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Ice—Transitory and Eternal

A Surprising Interpretation of Cable

Ice—Transitory and Eternal

A Surprising Interpretation of Cable

Sculpted in Ice

The weather wasn’t the only thing icy on a frigid day in New York City. At the David Yurman boutique in Soho, visitors encountered a Cable bracelet with an entirely different kind of cool, a form as captivating as it was ephemeral.

Carved out of a tremendous block of ice by artist Shintaro Okamoto, the bracelet was a powerful counterpoint to the everlasting beauty of precious metals and diamonds—ice of a different kind. In the video above, see Okamoto work on the piece as he describes the process of his craft.

Sculpted in Ice

The weather wasn’t the only thing icy on a frigid day in New York City. At the David Yurman boutique in Soho, visitors encountered a Cable bracelet with an entirely different kind of cool, a form as captivating as it was ephemeral.

Carved out of a tremendous block of ice by artist Shintaro Okamoto, the bracelet was a powerful counterpoint to the everlasting beauty of precious metals and diamonds—ice of a different kind. In the video above, see Okamoto work on the piece as he describes the process of his craft.

A black-and-white photo of Shintaro Okamoto wearing white gloves while carving a DY cable bracelet from ice.

Detail of Shintaro Okamoto carving the DY cable bracelet.

Detail of Shintaro Okamoto carving the DY cable bracelet.

The Double
Meaning of Ice

Some say that diamonds are called “ice” because they resemble frozen water. Others cite a more scientific reason: a diamond remains cool to the touch even when heated.
 
Regardless of why, their crystalline, mesmerizing beauty is where the similarity between ice and diamonds ends. The nickname juxtaposes two diametrically opposed materials, playing with the contradiction of the transient with the everlasting.

David Yurman was one of the very first jewelry designers to set diamonds in sterling silver. He calls these creations Silver Ice®, an apt name for pieces that pair everyday style with exquisite luxury.

The Double
Meaning of Ice

Some say that diamonds are called “ice” because they resemble frozen water. Others cite a more scientific reason: a diamond has one of the highest thermal conductivities at room temperature of any material.

Regardless of why, their crystalline, mesmerizing beauty is where the similarity between ice and diamonds ends. The nickname juxtaposes two diametrically opposed materials, playing with the contradiction of the transient with the everlasting.

David Yurman was one of the very first jewelry designers to set diamonds in sterling silver. He calls these creations Silver Ice®, an apt name for pieces that pair everyday style with exquisite luxury.

A color photograph of people taking pictures of 'Ice Watch Project,' ice sculptures by Olafur Eliasson and Minik Thorleif Rosing at Place du Pantheon in Paris. A color photograph of artist Ai Weiwei’s lion sculptures carved from ice at night at Norrmalmstorg before the Stockholm International Film Festival 2014.

ABOVE: 'Ice Watch Project' by Olafur Eliasson and Minik
Thorleif Rosing at Place du Pantheon in Paris.
 

RIGHT: Ai Weiwei ice sculptures at Norrmalmstorg before the
Stockholm International Film Festival 2014.

ABOVE: 'Ice Watch Project' by Olafur Eliasson and Minik
Thorleif Rosing at Place du Pantheon in Paris.


RIGHT: Ai Weiwei ice sculptures at Norrmalmstorg before the
Stockholm International Film Festival 2014.

Ice as Art

As David makes sculpture to wear from brilliant diamonds, audacious sculptors like Shintaro Okamoto shape ice into arresting, emblematic forms. Frozen water can make a meaningful statement about time, nature, longevity and power. In that sense, it’s not so different from diamonds.
 

Ai Weiwei, one of the most influential artists living today, is a Chinese political dissident and activist who uses art to make political statements. At the opening of the Stockholm International Film Festival in 2013, he created a buzz with two beautiful lions carved from ice. Inspired by the lion sculptures that guard Beijing’s Forbidden City, they symbolized that even the most powerful nations and leaders eventually fade.
 

Danish sculptor Olafur Eliasson, in partnership with the geologist Minik Rosing, created installations in Copenhagen and Paris called “Ice Watch” in 2014. He used a dozen icebergs from Greenland on the occasion of the Climate Change Conference to raise awareness of the phenomenon. Placed in a huge circle so the frozen forms created a “clock,” visitors directly observed the reality of melting arctic ice.

Ice as Art

As David makes sculpture to wear from brilliant diamonds, audacious sculptors like Shintaro Okamoto shape ice into arresting, emblematic forms. Frozen water can make a meaningful statement about time, nature, longevity and power. In that sense, it’s not so different from diamonds.
 

Ai Weiwei, one of the most influential artists living today, is a Chinese political dissident and activist who uses art to make political statements. At the opening of the Stockholm International Film Festival in 2013, he created a buzz with two beautiful lions carved from ice. Inspired by the lion sculptures that guard Beijing’s Forbidden City, they symbolized that even the most powerful nations and leaders eventually fade.
 

Danish sculptor Olafur Eliasson, in partnership with the geologist Minik Rosing, created installations in Copenhagen and Paris called “Ice Watch” in 2014. He used a dozen icebergs from Greenland on the occasion of the Climate Change Conference to raise awareness of the phenomenon. Placed in a huge circle so the frozen forms created a “clock,” visitors directly observed the reality of melting arctic ice.

An Enchanted
Holiday

For the Yurman family, encountering ice is a magical experience that inspired our 2018 Holiday campaign and windows.

An Enchanted Holiday

For the Yurman family, encountering ice is a magical experience that inspired our 2018 Holiday campaign and windows.