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A Yurman Love Story

Art and design brought David and Sybil Yurman together and led them
to create collections that celebrate how love inspires.

A Yurman Love Story

Art and design brought David and Sybil Yurman
together and led them to create collections that
celebrate how love inspires.

Looking for Each Other

Born two months and a few miles apart, David and Sybil Yurman led parallel lives, coming
to art separately in their youth. In the 1960s, they were both involved in the underground
art worlds of New York and California, going back and forth between the Village and the
West Coast.

Despite traveling in the same circles, they never met. At one point, both
were putting notices on the bulletin board at City Lights Bookstore in San Francisco,
“home” of the beat poets, looking for friends or places to live. Sybil muses, “We were really
looking for each other—we just didn't know it."

Looking for Each Other

Born two months and a few miles apart, David
and Sybil Yurman led parallel lives, coming to
art separately in their youth. In the 1960s, they were
both involved in the underground  art worlds of New
York and California, going back and forth between
the Village and the West Coast.

Despite traveling in the same circles, they never met.
At one point, both were putting notices on the bulletin
board at City Lights Bookstore in San Francisco, “home”
of the beat poets, looking for friends or places to live.
Sybil muses, “We were really looking for each other
—we just didn't know it."

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ABOVE

David and Sybil Yurman both put notices
on the bulletin board at City Lights Bookstore
in San Francisco.

ABOVE

David and Sybil Yurman both put notices
on the bulletin board at City Lights Bookstore
in San Francisco.

Alt Text

ABOVE
 

Sybil caught David Yurman’s eye with
her wild black hair and unique style.

When David Met Sybil

It was September of 1969. Tie-dye and bell-bottoms were all the
rage, but Sybil had her own distinct style. David, a foreman in Hans
Van de Bovenkamp’s sculpture studio in Greenwich Village, remembers
seeing Sybil for the first time when she applied for a job there. She had
wild black hair and wore colorful Peruvian ponchos—both as a top and skirt.
 

“I was just smitten,” David recalls. He did a triple take as Sybil strode
across the loft, her black boots with red laces and little bells tinkling
with each step.

ABOVE

Sybil caught David Yurman’s eye with
her wild black hair and unique style.

When David Met Sybil

It was September of 1969. Tie-dye and bell-bottoms were all the rage, but Sybil had her own distinct style. David, a foreman in Hans Van de Bovenkamp’s sculpture studio in Greenwich Village, remembers seeing Sybil for the first time when she applied for a job there. She had wild black hair and wore colorful Peruvian ponchos—both as a top and skirt.

 

“I was just smitten,” David recalls. He did a triple take as Sybil strode across the loft, her black boots with red laces and little bells tinkling with each step

First Date

Sybil got the job at Van de Bovenkamp’s studio. After a couple months of mutual
admiration at a distance, she asked David if he wanted to join her on a day trip to Bear
Mountain State Park in upstate New York. The night before, an ice storm had transformed
the park into an extraordinary winter wonderland, the branches of the trees glistening like
a scene from a Russian fairy tale. It was a magical day.
 

First Date

Sybil got the job at Van de Bovenkamp’s studio. After a couple months of mutual admiration at a distance, she asked David if he wanted to join her on a day trip to Bear Mountain State Park in upstate New York. The night before, an ice storm had transformed the park into an extraordinary winter wonderland, the branches of the trees glistening like a scene from a Russian fairy tale. It was a magical day.

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ABOVE
 

An hour north of New York City, Bear Mountain
State Park is a magical landscape where one can
get lost in reverie or discover true love.

ABOVE

An hour north of New York City, Bear Mountain
State Park is a magical landscape where one can
get lost in reverie or discover true love.

A Deepening Connection

David and Sybil’s connection deepened in the frozen silence. Back in the city, they
agreed their attraction was stronger than merely liking each other.

Months later, Sybil invited him over to her studio. “I was just blown away by what she
was doing.” David recalls. “I thought, oh my god, she is a great talent.” Not long after, he
moved in and their life was making art.
 

A Deepening Connection

David and Sybil’s connection deepened in the
frozen silence. Back in the city, they agreed
their attraction was stronger than merely
liking each other.

 

Months later, Sybil invited him over to her studio.
“I was just blown away by what she was doing.”
David recalls. “I thought, oh my god, she is a
great talent.” Not long after, he moved in and
their life was making art

I’m welding. She’s painting.
Life is art.

—David Yurman

I’m welding.
She’s painting.
Life is art.

—David Yurman

The Wedding

On September 27, 1979, David and Sybil married. David calls it the strangest wedding ever.
Before the big day, they had taken a blood test (a law at the time) and the ceremony had to be
scheduled within five days in order to obtain the marriage certificate. In the elevator on their
way to the ceremony, Sybil, wearing her corsage and flowers, looked at David and asked,

The Wedding

On September 27, 1979, David and Sybil married. David calls it the strangest wedding ever. Before the big day, they had taken a blood test (a law at the time) and the ceremony had to be scheduled within five days in order to obtain the marriage certificate. In the elevator on their way to the ceremony, Sybil, wearing her corsage and flowers, looked at David and asked, 

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David headed back to their studio and quickly soldered some simple bands from gold. “So
we got married—as simple as that,” says David. “And, then we had an appointment to see
a man who was buying fledgling jewelry businesses.” 

Sybil and David thought that by selling their young company they could go back to being
full-time artists—a wedding present to each other. But the offer was too low. “Are you
kidding?” Sybil said, “Let’s get the hell out of here!” So, the wedding gift was keeping the
business after all.

David headed back to their studio and quickly soldered some simple bands from gold. “So we got married—as simple as that,” says David. “And, then we had an appointment to see a man who was buying fledgling jewelry businesses."
 

Sybil and David thought that by selling their young company they could go back to being full-time artists—a wedding present to each other. But the offer was too low. “Are you kidding?” Sybil said, “Let’s get the hell out of here!” So, the wedding gift was keeping the business after all.

Love Inspires

Thirty-five years later, David designed the
DY Crossover ring for Sybil as a metaphor
of their decades of creative collaboration.
With intertwined bands holding a diamond,
it represented unity and became the first
design in the David Yurman Wedding Collection.
Today, with their son, Evan, they continue to
create artistic expressions that celebrate a shared
commitment and a deep emotional connection.

Love Inspires

Thirty-five years later, David designed the DYCrossover ring for Sybil as a metaphor of theirdecades of creative collaboration. With intertwined bands holding a diamond, it represented unity and became the first design in the David Yurman Wedding Collection. Today, with their son, Evan, they continue to create artistic expressions that celebrate a shared commitment and a deep emotional connection.